Employee Development

 

Coaching and Counseling

Definition of Coaching: A directive process by a manager to train and orient an employee to the realities of the workplace and to help the employee remove barriers to optimum work performance. According to Berry and Fehrmann (1993), it is the process of developing employees by providing them with opportunities to develop their skills and experience while ensuring they receive continuous feedback, counseling, and follow up.

Definition of Counseling: A supportive process facilitated by a manager to help an employee define and work through personal problems that affect job performance.

Tips

  • Determine whether it is working well to follow an individual’s coaching preferences. There may be times when you need to change your approach. For example, people might say they will come to you when they need help, but they don’t and they continue to have problems. This is an example of when you should intervene rather than wait for a request for help.

  • Regularly talk about your development with others. Let them know what you are working on. Invite feedback and coaching from others. Make it easy for them to talk with you about how you are doing.

  • Pay attention to when people are most open to discussion and how they like to structure it. Some people tend to be more open to conversations in the morning, others later in the day. Some people prefer informal conversations; others like to prepare.

  • As a coach, you want to identify the root cause, not the end result. For instance, you may maximize your coaching efforts by ensuring that you focus on the root cause of an employee’s area of weakness, rather than just the surface-level issue. For example, an employee with poor communication skills may have an underlying weakness—such as a lack of product knowledge—that you must make sure to address, rather than just focusing on improving his/her communication skills.

  • Don’t forget to analyze external factors (e.g., systematic problems, lack of resources) that may influence the person’s performance.

Self-Directed Learning Activities

Relevant Readings:

Books:

  • Fournies, F. F. (1987). Coaching for improved work performance. Liberty House.

  • Minor, M. (2002). Coaching and counseling a practical guide for managers and team leaders. Crisp Learning.

  • Peterson, D. B., & Hicks, M. D. (1996). Leader as coach. Personnel Decisions Inc.

  • Whitworth, L. (2007).Co-active coaching: New skills for coaching people toward success in work and life. Davies-Black Publishing.

PowerPoints/Videos:

Guided-Learning Activities

Experiences:

  • Identify someone who you may be a coach to, ask him/her how you can be most helpful to them. Ask for examples of when you and others have been effective or helpful as coaches. Also, find out what he/she does not like in a coach.

  • If possible, ask your supervisor or someone you identify as a coach to work through the 7-step Coaching Model (handout) with you. If it is not possible, identify someone you may be a coach to and work through the 7-Step Coaching Model together.

  • If possible, askyour supervisor or someone you identify as a coach to work together and develop a coaching plan. See handout (Coaching Plan Guidelines (PDF)) on suggestions for creating a coaching plan and a coaching plan template.

 

Formal Training/Education

School and Course Module:

Laramie Country Community College

MGT 1500 3 CREDITS LEADERSHIP ESSENTIALS Students develop performance-based competencies and skills needed to prepare for leadership positions in today's workplace. Topics explored include leadership communication, conflict resolution, employee and self development, change management, coaching, managing performance problems, and team building. Students develop action plans for transitioning the skills discussed during class into the workplace.

CNSL 2300 3 CREDITS COUNSELING SKILLS FOR HELPING PROFESSIONALS Students discuss and apply basic counseling and communication skills. In addition, students develop and demonstrate a command of basic skills including listening, responding, encouraging, and initiating change in interpersonal communication through mediation and conflict resolution.

Central Wyoming College

Counseling-2300: This course presents instruction and practice in basic counseling and communication skills. It emphasizes listening, responding, encouraging, and initiating change in interpersonal communication through mediation and conflict resolution. (3 lect.)

Online Courses:

 

Empowerment

Definition: Assigning responsibilities and decision-making in a way that makes people responsible for results as well as the methods of achieving those results. Encouraging others to take on new challenges and providing sufficient resources to assist with achieving their goals.

Tips

Remember: Great supervisors allow their employees to do great work and support them in the process. Here are some tips for how to successfully empower others:

Foster Open Communication

Allow others to voice thoughts and concerns knowing that their opinions are values

Reward Self-Improvement

Help individuals plan for growth and reward them as they grow and develop by providing them with new opportunities to practice learned skills

Encourage Safe Failure

Trying new things often means failure, and failure is one of the best ways to learn; providing an environment where people feel safe making mistakes ensures individuals gain understanding and skill

Provide Plenty of Context

We all carry around a great deal of information in our brain, however we often fail to realize that others don’t have access to that same knowledge. Providing context around the purpose, direction and need for any given task will enable individuals to handle similar situations in the future.

Clearly Define Roles

People who don't know what they are supposed to do can't do it very well. Establishing specific roles and responsibilities enables individuals to work together effectively

Require Accountability

Individuals need to know if they are meeting expectations. Be consistent and diligent in your measurement of rewards so that employees are motivated to do their best

Support Their Independence

Don’t micro-manage. Give employees the space to complete tasks and learn on their own. It’s hard to see mistakes being made, but allowing employees the room to make them enables them to learn and grow.

Appreciate Their Efforts

An empowered individual works for more than just a paycheck. Appreciate the contributions of individuals and value their participation. Celebrate good work.

Self-Directed Learning Activities

Relevant Readings:

  • 6 Ways to Empower your employees with Transformational Leadership

http://www.forbes.com/sites/drewhendricks/2014/01/27/6-ways-to-empower-your-employees-with-transformational-leadership/#b6ce7773268d

Books:

  • Blanchard, K. H., Carlos, J. P., & Randolph, W. A. (1999). The 3 keys to empowerment: Release the power within people for astonishing results. Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

  • Ginnodo, B. (1997). The power of empowerment. Arlington Heights, IL: Pride Publications, Inc.

  • McBee, S. (2003). To lead is to empower: Leadership to empower your employees and yourself.

PowerPoints/Videos:

Guided Learning Activities

Experiences (use one of the three learning journals to track your experiences):

  • Volunteer for a leadership role on a project at work and follow the tips above to empower your team; discuss your experience with a trusted coach or mentor

  • Think outside of your work-life, do you lead others on a sports team, through projects at home, with your children? Apply what you’ve learned about empowerment in those situations and reflect on how they are share similarities with situations your experience at work.

  • Identify a superior who you think empowers others, schedule a time to talk with them about their management techniques, consider asking:

o What do they think are the the rules of thumb they are following?

o Where did they learn the behaviors?

o How do they monitor the effect they have on others?

Formal Training and Education

School and Course Module(s):

Laramie County Community College:

MGT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISION Students acquire techniques to improve or establish themselves as first-line supervisors. The student will understand and be able to apply basic management principles in solving problems encountered by first-line supervisors. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 or equivalent placement test score.

Northwest College:

MGT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISION Students acquire knowledge and skills used in supervision, organization, time management, decision-making, and information management. Students work with practical applications that reinforce the theory. Through comprehensive cases and illustrations, students examine the interrelationship of key supervisory management principles. (3 hrs lec)

Eastern Wyoming Community College:

MGT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISION This course seeks to develop an understanding and appreciation of the basic concepts of supervision, to include planning, organizing, human resources management, directing, and controlling. Topics covered also include motivation, delegation, leadership, communications, team-building, total quality management, and discipline. The course should assist one to acquire the skills necessary

 

Mentoring

Definition: A mentor is typically an individual high up in the organization who is not the immediate supervisor, his/her goals are to support and guide the mentee’s personal growthand long-term personal career development, to advise the mentee about the things that the mentee should and shouldn’t do, and to develop the mentee’s self-esteem and work identity.

TIPS

  • Find a mentor higher up in the organization who can help you learn to influence those with more authority than you. Mentors may have insights about norms or general techniques, suggest tactics specific to certain individuals you will encounter, or connect you to networks that would otherwise be closed to you.

  • The role of a mentor is to listen and be supportive, provide non-judgmental support, provide guidance on issues raised, clarify goals of mentee, and to pass on knowledge and experience.

  • The four key factors to successful mentoring relationships are to 1) developa relationship of trust, 2) define roles and responsibilities, 3) establish short and long term goals, and 4) collaborate to solve problems.

“A mentor is “...someone who helps someone else learn something that he or she would have learned less well, more slowly, or not at all if left alone.”

                                                                                                                                      –Chip Bell, Author and Founder of The Chip Bell Group

Self-Directed Learning Activities

Relevant Readings:

Books:

  • Allen, T. D., & Eby, L. T. (Eds.). (2011). The Blackwell handbook of mentoring: A multiple perspectives approach. John Wiley & Sons.

  • Bell, C. R., & Goldsmith, M. (2013). Managers as mentors: Building partnerships for learning. Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

  • Peddy, S. (1998). The art of mentoring: Lead, follow and get out of the way. Learning Connections.

  • Phillips-Jones, L. (2003). 75 Things to Do with Your Mentees: Practical and Effective Development Ideas You Can Try. CCC/The Mentoring Group. http://mentoringgroup.com/cart/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=14

PowerPoints/Videos:

Guided - Learning Activities

Experiences:

  • Be a mentor to another individual (e.g., bring an employee along with you when you call on customers, allow an employee to shadow you during the work day, invite an employee to sit in on an off-site management meeting).

  • If possible, ask someone you identify as a mentor to engage in these activities with you:Invite mentee to one of Mentor's key meetings.

    • Debrief with mentee afterward.

    • Share career stories. Career start, changes made along the way, high and low points. What experiences were helpful?

    • Discuss a role model that has been influential in each of your lives. How has s/he impacted your decisions or beliefs?

    • Discuss mentee's personal vision: What would he/she like to be remembered for over the next few years?

    • Talk about topics not pertaining to work: news and events, family history, hobbies, movie.

    • Discuss mentee’s strengths and how to enhance their growth. (Mentee should find information from their own observations, comments in performance reviews, informal feedback from supervisors or coworkers (by e-mail, for example), educational grades). What do people say you do best? Mentor can add his/her observations.

    • Conduct informal networking by introducing mentee to at least two people who could prove helpful to their careers. Before, provide tips on issues to address or avoid, and review afterwards

    • Communicate about what you have appreciated about your mentoring relationship with one another and thus far. This type of "check-in" can only be done in a note or e-mail

Formal Training/Education

School and Course Module(s):

Laramie County Community College

CO/M 1030 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION Students develop skills in interpersonal communication by examining topics such as perception, identity, listening, nonverbal communication, relationship development, conflict management and diversity. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 or equivalent placement test score.

Northwest College

CO/M 2015 -Leadership Skills(1-3)This course is designed to educate specified groups in effective leadership skills. Includes discussion and practice in teamwork, communication, critical thinking and problem solving, planning, conflict management, and social responsibility. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. (.5 hr lec, 1 hr lab)

MGT 1000 -Introduction to Supervision(3)Students acquire knowledge and skills used in supervision, organization, time management, decision-making, and information management. Students work with practical applications that reinforce the theory. Through comprehensive cases and illustrations, students examine the interrelationship of key supervisory management principles. (3 hrs lec)

Western Wyoming Community College

COMM 1070 EFFECTIVE LISTENING-Listening is the process of hearing, attending to, interpreting, remembering, and responding to spoken messages. This course will explore listening theories and research, the listening process, listening challenges, various listening contexts; and essential listening skills.

 

Follow-Up and Feedback

Definition: Feedback is a process involving the exchange of information between a supervisor and an employee about performance expectations and the performance exhibited by that individual. Feedback is not just the sharing of critical or constructive information, but also positive examples of effective performance.

Tips

Feedback should be:

  • Specific: It’s important that feedback is related to a specific event or instance of positive or negative performance. Rather than saying “you’re doing a good (or bad) job”, explain specifically what the individual is doing and how it is impacting the situation.

  • Timely: Attempt to give feedback in as timely a manner as possible. The closer to the event, the more the individual will be able to reflect on the circumstance in real time. Note, however, that you should always ask an individual if they are ready to receive feedback.

  • Private:Critical performance feedback should always be given in a private location, and should only be shared between you and the relevant parties. It’s also important to consider the personality of the individual to whom you’re giving feedback. Does this person tend to be defensive? Are they a morning person?

What exactly is specific feedback?

  • When feedback is specific it contains the three following pieces of information:

    • Situation: Anchors feedback in time, place, and circumstances and ​helps receiver remember and/or understand the context

    • Behavior: Observable actions that can be recorded (audio or video) and allows feedback receiver to know exactly what he or she did that had impact

    • Impact: Feelings and thoughts the feedback giver had, and how the feedback giver or others behaved as a result of the feedback receiver's behavior

  • Read more about the Situation-Behavior-Impact method of giving feedback in the power point below!

Self - Directed Learning Activities

Relevant Readings:

Books:

  • Harvard Business Review. (2016). HBR Guide to Delivering Effective Feedback

  • Stone, D., & Heen, S. (2015). Thanks for the feedback: The science and art of receiving feedback well. Penguin.

  • Weitzel, S. R. (2008). Feedback That Works: How to Build and Deliver Your Message. Center for Creative leadership.

PowerPoints/Videos:

Self Guided Training:

Guided Learning Activities

Experiences:

  • Volunteer to mentor a new employee, during their training practice providing both positive and developmental feedback. On occasion, check in with your mentee and ask them about the effectiveness of your feedback. Is your feedback complete? Does it come at a good time?

  • Work with a trusted coworker or your supervisor to practice feedback messages using the SBI model. Write down some of your thoughts and then share them out loud. Get suggestions about your delivery.

  • Remember, you don’t need to be in a position of authority to give feedback. Practice using the SBI model to give feedback to your peers.

  • Feedback isn’t just for the workplace, you can practice giving effective feedback with family and in group activities outside of work.

Formal Training/Education

School and Course Module:

Casper College

COM/MGT 2130 -Human Relations: This course is designed to help students become successful in predicting, understanding, and influencing the outcome of their interactions with others by better understanding themselves. The course will involve readings, group activities, class discussions and short essays to explore and analyze theoretical concepts of human relations and their application from a personal, interpersonal, and organizational perspective.

Eastern Wyoming College

CO/M 1040 Introduction to Human Communication: This course focuses on the role of communication in current affairs, business, and personal relations. Practical application of theory to communication problems in everyday life.

MGT 1000 Introduction to Supervision: This course seeks to develop an understanding and appreciation of the basic concepts of supervision, to include planning, organizing, human resources management, directing, and controlling. Topics covered also include motivation, delegation, leadership, communications, team-building, total quality management, and discipline.

Laramie County Community College

MGT 1000 Introduction to Supervision: Students acquire techniques to improve or establish themselves as first-line supervisors. The student will understand and be able to apply basic management principles in solving problems encountered by first-line supervisors.

 

MGT 1500 Leadership Essentials: Students develop performance-based competencies and skills needed to prepare for leadership positions in today's workplace. Topics explored include leadership communication, conflict resolution, employee and self-development, change management, coaching, managing performance problems, and team building

Northwest College

CO/M 2015-Leadership Skills: This course is designed to educate specified groups in effective leadership skills. Includes discussion and practice in teamwork, communication, critical thinking and problem solving, planning, conflict management, and social responsibility.

 

Delegation

Definition: Assigning responsibility and authority to someone in order to complete a clearly defined and agreed upon task while you retain ultimate responsibility for its success.

TIPS

Use the SMARTER acronym when considering delegating a task:

  • Specific – make sure the task is defined and clear

  • Measurable – make sure progress and outcome are measurable

  • Agreed –be sure to gain agreement from the delegated individual

  • Realistic –match skill with tasks; only delegate assignments that can be accomplished

  • Time bound –be clear about time frame of the task

  • Ethical –never delegate a task you would be unwilling to do yourself

  • Recorded –keep records of delegated tasks in order to track progress/ accountability

 

                                             “Delegating work works, provided the one delegating works, too.”

                                                                                                                                                                 - Robert Half – American businessman

Self-Directed Learning Activities

Relevant Readings:

Books:

  • Allen,D. (2003). Getting things done: The art of stress-free productivity. New York: Penguin Books.

  • Bossidy, L., & Charan, R. (with Burck, C.). (2002). Execution: The discipline of getting things done. New York: Crown Business.

  • Burns, R. (2001). Making delegation happen: A simple and effective guide to implementing successful delegation. Crows Nest, AU: Allen & Unwin.

  • Dittmer, R. E., & McFarland, S. (2008). 151 Quick ideas for delegating and decision making. Franklin Lakes, NJ: Career Press.

PowerPoints/Videos:

Self-Guided Activities:

Guided Learning Activities

Experiences:

  • Volunteer to lead a project at work, use the SMART task sheet (PDF) to plan and track delegated assignments. Use one of the Learning Journals to reflect after practicing delegation.

    • Meet with your supervisor

  • Consider how your supervisor delegates work to you and others; use the SMART task sheet (PDF) to track the tasks that have been delegated to you. Review this sheet with your supervisor and discuss the delegation process-are there areas for improvement? Are there skills or abilities you might be able to develop through delegation?

  • If you don’t have the opportunity to lead an assignment at work, think of how you might delegate tasks outside of work with your family, church, or sports group. Do you follow the SMARTER acronym? Use one of the Learning Journals to reflect after practicing delegation.

Formal Training/Education

School and Course Module(s):

Laramie County Community College:

MGT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISION Students acquire techniques to improve or establish themselves as first-line supervisors. The student will understand and be able to apply basic management principles in solving problems encountered by first-line supervisors. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 or equivalent placement test score.

Northwest College:

MGT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISION Students acquire knowledge and skills used in supervision, organization, time management, decision-making, and information management. Students work with practical applications that reinforce the theory. Through comprehensive cases and illustrations, students examine the interrelationship of key supervisory management principles. (3 hrs lec)

Eastern Wyoming Community College:

MGT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISION This course seeks to develop an understanding and appreciation of the basic concepts of supervision, to include planning, organizing, human resources management, directing, and controlling. Topics covered also include motivation, delegation, leadership, communications, team-building, total quality management, and discipline. The course should assist one to acquire the skills necessary

 

Training

Definition: Training is the formal and systematic modification of behavior through learning which occurs as a result of education, instruction, development, and planned experience.

TIPS

  • Different types of training methods include: on-the-job training (job rotation, mentoring, coaching), off-the-job training (courses, conferences, films, study materials), self-directed learning, and structured exercises.

  • It is crucial to use feedback as it is vital to support learning.

  • It is important to consider trainee readiness, that is, before trainees can benefit from any form of training, they must be ready to learn. They must have the particular background experiences necessary for being successful in the training program, and they must be motivated to learn.

  • A Training Needs Assessment (TNA) includes: 1) organizational support analysis, 2) organizational analysis, 3) task and KSA analysis, and 4) person analysis. It is important to consider ways to enhance the transfer of training and to evaluate training programs whenever given the opportunity to.

  • A good trainer leads by example, knows the subject to be trained, establishes a strong working relationship with the learners, is patient and enthusiastic, and communicates often

Self-Directed Learning Activities

Relevant Readings:

Books:

  • Goldstein, I. L., & Ford, J. K. (2002). Training in organizations. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth

  • Mager, R. F. (1999). What Every Manager Should Know about Training: An Insider's Guide to Getting Your Money's Worth from Training. Center for Effective Performance.

  • Noe, R. A. (2010). Employee training and development. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

  • How to train others EBook: http://www.practical-management-skills.com/how-to-train-others.html

PowerPoints/Videos:

Self-Guided Activities:

  • Think about how your current trainings are being delivered. What has been the most effective? Are you given the opportunity to practice what you have learned? What would you change or want more of or less of?

Guided Learning Activities

Experiences:

  • Practice conducting a training needs assessment with your supervisor.

  • Meet with your coworkers and ask them what it is they’d like to be trained on. Ask them why and how it applies to their job and the bigger picture.

  • What have they enjoyed or wished to change about previous trainings?

  • Ask your supervisor about business goals and how they aim to reach them through training.

  • Observe people over time to understand what is important to them and what they view as rewarding. Regularly talk with them about how their work is going, what help they need, and what they are learning.

Formal Training/Education

School and Course Module(s):

Eastern Wyoming College

CRMJ 1950 General Instructor Development (2L, 2CR): This comprehensive and up-to-date program will help you develop your individual training skills. Key training points in this step-by-step approach will help you create quality training programs for your agency. Included in this course will be hands-on exercises that will allow you to write your own instructional goals, construct a lesson plan, develop a teaching method, and conduct a presentation for your class. Your final presentation will be videotaped for your confidential review. This course if offered for S/U grade only. Prerequisite: P.O.S.T. certification.

MGT 1000 Introduction to Supervision (3L, 3CR): This course seeks to develop an understanding and appreciation of the basic concepts of supervision, to include planning, organizing, human resources management, directing, and controlling. Topics covered also include motivation, delegation, leadership, communications, team-building, total quality management, and discipline. The course should assist one to acquire the skills necessary

Northwest College

CO/M 2015 -Leadership Skills (1-3): This course is designed to educate specified groups in effective leadership skills. Includes discussion and practice in teamwork, communication, critical thinking and problem solving, planning, conflict management, and social responsibility. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. (.5 hr lec, 1 hr lab)

Western Wyoming Community College

COMM 1070 EFFECTIVE LISTENING: Listening is the process of hearing, attending to, interpreting, remembering, and responding to spoken messages. This course will explore listening theories and research, the listening process, listening challenges, various listening contexts; and essential listening skills.

MGT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISION:This course will furnish the student with a knowledge of employer-employee relations from the standpoint of both the employee and the supervisor. Current practices of this type of human relations are studied and discussed in recognition of their importance to worker morale and productivity.